July 21, 2014   494 notes
ewilloughby:

Changyuraptor yangi is a newly-described microraptorine dromaeosaur dinosaur from the early Cretaceous (Yixian formation) of Liaoning, China.
The animal would have been around 4 feet long in life, and its fossil shows that it was covered in feathers — including, as in its smaller cousin Microraptor, a pair of “leg wings” represented by long paired pennaceous feathers on the metatarsals and tibiotarsus. One of Changyuraptor's most unique features is its voluminous tail feathers, and these feathers constitute the longest of any known non-avian dinosaur, with the most distal retrices reaching around 30 cm in length.
Changyuraptor is also by far the largest “four-winged” dinosaur known, and while this might not be as big of a deal as it sounds (given that there aren’t very many “four-winged” dinosaurs), it does show that small size wasn’t necessarily the gatekeeper to certain volant adaptations. I personally doubt that this animal was doing anything approaching powered flight, but the long tail feathers and multiple sets of long, well-developed lifting surfaces may have been a boon to gliding and controlled descent. The exceptionally long tail feathers therefore might have been used as a sort of “pitch control” device, wherein a large, relatively heavy animal would have needed especially fine-tuned control over rapid falls onto prey or in safe landings from higher ground. As Buzz Lightyear would say, “This isn’t flying, it’s falling with style!”
—
Gouache paint on A3-size hot-pressed illustration board, approx. 5-6 hours.
Gang Han et al. 2014. “A new raptorial dinosaur with exceptionally long feathering provides insights into dromaeosaurid flight performance”. Nature Communications. 5: 4382.

ewilloughby:

Changyuraptor yangi is a newly-described microraptorine dromaeosaur dinosaur from the early Cretaceous (Yixian formation) of Liaoning, China.

The animal would have been around 4 feet long in life, and its fossil shows that it was covered in feathers — including, as in its smaller cousin Microraptor, a pair of “leg wings” represented by long paired pennaceous feathers on the metatarsals and tibiotarsus. One of Changyuraptor's most unique features is its voluminous tail feathers, and these feathers constitute the longest of any known non-avian dinosaur, with the most distal retrices reaching around 30 cm in length.

Changyuraptor is also by far the largest “four-winged” dinosaur known, and while this might not be as big of a deal as it sounds (given that there aren’t very many “four-winged” dinosaurs), it does show that small size wasn’t necessarily the gatekeeper to certain volant adaptations. I personally doubt that this animal was doing anything approaching powered flight, but the long tail feathers and multiple sets of long, well-developed lifting surfaces may have been a boon to gliding and controlled descent. The exceptionally long tail feathers therefore might have been used as a sort of “pitch control” device, wherein a large, relatively heavy animal would have needed especially fine-tuned control over rapid falls onto prey or in safe landings from higher ground. As Buzz Lightyear would say, “This isn’t flying, it’s falling with style!”

Gouache paint on A3-size hot-pressed illustration board, approx. 5-6 hours.

Gang Han et al. 2014. “A new raptorial dinosaur with exceptionally long feathering provides insights into dromaeosaurid flight performance”. Nature Communications. 5: 4382.

July 15, 2014   5,010 notes

slaaneshi-party-bus:

catbountry:

prguitarman:

What the fuck is happening

A lot.

Ace Rimmer. What a guy.

(Source: starscream-and-hutch, via infinitemachine)

July 9, 2014   290,045 notes

feathernotdot:

huffingtonpost:

Kids Are Given Game Boys, Feel Instant Sadness

Ah, Game Boys. Forget your 3DS and your iPad mini: there was a day when these handheld hunks of 8-bit glory owned the playground. But these kids don’t remember it so watch the full hilarious video of their reactions to the original Game Boy here. 

(Source: The Fine Brothers)

Gameboy was my fucking childhood. 

…….this is the saddest thing I have seen…..

June 26, 2014   1,043 notes
paleoillustration:

Phorusrhacos by Antarctic Spring

paleoillustration:

Phorusrhacos by Antarctic Spring

(via infinitemachine)

May 25, 2014   62,942 notes

(Source: tastefullyoffensive, via feathernotdot)

May 16, 2014   288,054 notes
drinkyourfuckingmilk:

 

drinkyourfuckingmilk:

 

(Source: jedisonic-x, via infinitemachine)

April 24, 2014   203,891 notes

thatshybutrudegirl:

chacha-again:

sizvideos:

Who needs traffic lights? Not the drivers in Ethiopia - Video

This made me so uncomfortable.

O_o the people making a uturn.

(via feathernotdot)

April 16, 2014   101 notes
fuckyeahdinoart:

A Titan Emerges from the Fog by ~MattMart

fuckyeahdinoart:

A Titan Emerges from the Fog by ~MattMart

(via infinitemachine)

March 22, 2014   234 notes
antediluvianechoes:

Apatosaurus louisae, John Conway

Apatosaur affection is a balance between immensity and gentleness, like whales nuzzling atop Ionic columns, or Roman aqueducts trying to cuddle without crumbling. They brush those wide, suspension bridge necks together with unlikely grace—and hum. It is a low, tender, satisfied sound. The vibration adds intimacy to the hug, like feeling the tremble of a partner’s heartbeat during a lengthy embrace, or noting the flood of details felt in a first kiss; it’s an awareness, a deep recognition, of the other’s body, of their realness. The dinosaurs’ love songs roll through the forest. Waves of tender rumbles reverberate off trees, shake branches, echo through clearings, and drum in the ears as the distant thunder of lizards.

antediluvianechoes:

Apatosaurus louisae, John Conway

Apatosaur affection is a balance between immensity and gentleness, like whales nuzzling atop Ionic columns, or Roman aqueducts trying to cuddle without crumbling. They brush those wide, suspension bridge necks together with unlikely grace—and hum. It is a low, tender, satisfied sound. The vibration adds intimacy to the hug, like feeling the tremble of a partner’s heartbeat during a lengthy embrace, or noting the flood of details felt in a first kiss; it’s an awareness, a deep recognition, of the other’s body, of their realness. The dinosaurs’ love songs roll through the forest. Waves of tender rumbles reverberate off trees, shake branches, echo through clearings, and drum in the ears as the distant thunder of lizards.

(via infinitemachine)

March 10, 2014   1,443 notes
infinitemachine:

prehistoric-starships:

nefarious-tropy:

Bearded Vultures (Korkeasaari zoo)

For a second I thought they were dromaeosaurs.


YES.

infinitemachine:

prehistoric-starships:

nefarious-tropy:

Bearded Vultures (Korkeasaari zoo)

For a second I thought they were dromaeosaurs.

YES.

(Source: thegreatukauka)