September 20, 2014   9,074 notes

(Source: relentless-soul, via infinitemachine)

September 6, 2014   628 notes
ewilloughby:

This is a speculative reconstruction of a subadult Deinonychus displaying semi-arboreal characteristics. It’s based on the tenuous assumption that the type specimen (YPM 5205) represents an immature animal, as compared to later specimens with slightly different morphological characteristics, most notably the Harvard specimen (MCZ 4371) described in 1976. Ostrom noted in the description for this newer specimen that one of the major differences between this and the type is the angle of curvature for the second pedal claw: the newer specimen had a much straighter sickle claw, while the original was very strongly curved. However, he had no opinion at the time on whether this difference in morphology represented individual, ontogenetic, or sexual variation.(1)
In 2006, Parsons & Parsons demonstrated unequivocally that the Harvard specimen is a sexually mature adult, and identified some unique adult characters associated with this and other mature adult Deinonychus specimens.(2) Further study by the same authors in 2009 tentatively indicates that the type specimen—a possible subadult—may be associated with arboreal characteristics. Adult specimens are also found to have proportionally shorter arms, leaving room to speculate whether the longer arms of subadults could have been a semi-volant adaptation involved in some incipient gliding (or, perhaps more accurate for an animal that size, “descent-slowing”) capabilities. The more strongly recurved second pedal claw is implicated in climbing, and its lateral compression and inner arc are compared in this paper to the same ungual in Melanerpes, the red-headed woodpecker (a highly scansorial modern bird).(3)
Behavior rarely fossilizes, and the idea that immature Deinonychus occupied a partially arboreal niche is still highly speculative, especially given that few modern archosaurs possess markedly different ecologies at different ontogenic stages. And while I don’t usually support copying extant birds this precisely for serious paleoart, it proved to be an excellent practice piece to flesh out a highly speculative idea.
This piece is based directly on an excellent photograph by my most admired living scientist, experimental psychologist Steven Pinker, who was kind enough to grant me permission to do so. Pinker is a world-renowned cognitive scientist as well as a talented photographer, and you can check out more of his better angles of our nature on his website at stevepinker.com.
It’s interesting to note that of all known specimens of deinonychosaurs, a sizable percentage of them represent juveniles or subadults, animals that lived very brief lives before succumbing to nature’s indifference. For the life of a Deinonychus was surely solitary, poor, nasty, brutish and short.
—
1. Ostrom, J. H. (1976). “On a new specimen of the Lower Cretaceous theropod dinosaur Deinonychus antirrhopus”. Breviora 439: 1–21.2. Parsons, W. L.; Parsons, K. M. (2006). “Morphology and size of an adult specimen of Deinonychus antirrhopus, (Saurischia, Theropoda)”. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology 26 (3 sup.): 109A.3. Parsons, W. L.; Parsons, K. M. (2009). “Further descriptions of the osteology of Deinonychus antirrhopus (Saurischia, Theropoda)”. Bulletin of the Buffalo Society of Natural Sciences 38: 43–54.

ewilloughby:

This is a speculative reconstruction of a subadult Deinonychus displaying semi-arboreal characteristics. It’s based on the tenuous assumption that the type specimen (YPM 5205) represents an immature animal, as compared to later specimens with slightly different morphological characteristics, most notably the Harvard specimen (MCZ 4371) described in 1976. Ostrom noted in the description for this newer specimen that one of the major differences between this and the type is the angle of curvature for the second pedal claw: the newer specimen had a much straighter sickle claw, while the original was very strongly curved. However, he had no opinion at the time on whether this difference in morphology represented individual, ontogenetic, or sexual variation.(1)

In 2006, Parsons & Parsons demonstrated unequivocally that the Harvard specimen is a sexually mature adult, and identified some unique adult characters associated with this and other mature adult Deinonychus specimens.(2) Further study by the same authors in 2009 tentatively indicates that the type specimen—a possible subadult—may be associated with arboreal characteristics. Adult specimens are also found to have proportionally shorter arms, leaving room to speculate whether the longer arms of subadults could have been a semi-volant adaptation involved in some incipient gliding (or, perhaps more accurate for an animal that size, “descent-slowing”) capabilities. The more strongly recurved second pedal claw is implicated in climbing, and its lateral compression and inner arc are compared in this paper to the same ungual in Melanerpes, the red-headed woodpecker (a highly scansorial modern bird).(3)

Behavior rarely fossilizes, and the idea that immature Deinonychus occupied a partially arboreal niche is still highly speculative, especially given that few modern archosaurs possess markedly different ecologies at different ontogenic stages. And while I don’t usually support copying extant birds this precisely for serious paleoart, it proved to be an excellent practice piece to flesh out a highly speculative idea.

This piece is based directly on an excellent photograph by my most admired living scientist, experimental psychologist Steven Pinker, who was kind enough to grant me permission to do so. Pinker is a world-renowned cognitive scientist as well as a talented photographer, and you can check out more of his better angles of our nature on his website at stevepinker.com.

It’s interesting to note that of all known specimens of deinonychosaurs, a sizable percentage of them represent juveniles or subadults, animals that lived very brief lives before succumbing to nature’s indifference. For the life of a Deinonychus was surely solitary, poor, nasty, brutish and short.

1. Ostrom, J. H. (1976). “On a new specimen of the Lower Cretaceous theropod dinosaur Deinonychus antirrhopus”. Breviora 439: 1–21.

2. Parsons, W. L.; Parsons, K. M. (2006). “Morphology and size of an adult specimen of Deinonychus antirrhopus, (Saurischia, Theropoda)”. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology 26 (3 sup.): 109A.

3. Parsons, W. L.; Parsons, K. M. (2009). “Further descriptions of the osteology of Deinonychus antirrhopus (Saurischia, Theropoda)”. Bulletin of the Buffalo Society of Natural Sciences 38: 43–54.

September 6, 2014   178,084 notes

unamusedsloth:

Unnecessary Explosions.

(Source: unamusedsloth, via feathernotdot)

August 26, 2014   290 notes

I can relate to Godzilla in this gif.

(Source: knightbatman, via infinitemachine)

August 26, 2014   97 notes
fuckyeahdinoart:

Acrocanthosaurus atokensis. by Frank-Lode

fuckyeahdinoart:

Acrocanthosaurus atokensis. by Frank-Lode

(via infinitemachine)

August 12, 2014   152,926 notes
ahsadler:

deerypoof:

Of all a deer’s senses, their eyesight is the worst. 

I don’t know what I was expecting but this was so much better than that

ahsadler:

deerypoof:

Of all a deer’s senses, their eyesight is the worst. 

I don’t know what I was expecting but this was so much better than that

(via feathernotdot)

July 21, 2014   927 notes
ewilloughby:

Changyuraptor yangi is a newly-described microraptorine dromaeosaur dinosaur from the early Cretaceous (Yixian formation) of Liaoning, China.
The animal would have been around 4 feet long in life, and its fossil shows that it was covered in feathers — including, as in its smaller cousin Microraptor, a pair of “leg wings” represented by long paired pennaceous feathers on the metatarsals and tibiotarsus. One of Changyuraptor's most unique features is its voluminous tail feathers, and these feathers constitute the longest of any known non-avian dinosaur, with the most distal retrices reaching around 30 cm in length.
Changyuraptor is also by far the largest “four-winged” dinosaur known, and while this might not be as big of a deal as it sounds (given that there aren’t very many “four-winged” dinosaurs), it does show that small size wasn’t necessarily the gatekeeper to certain volant adaptations. I personally doubt that this animal was doing anything approaching powered flight, but the long tail feathers and multiple sets of long, well-developed lifting surfaces may have been a boon to gliding and controlled descent. The exceptionally long tail feathers therefore might have been used as a sort of “pitch control” device, wherein a large, relatively heavy animal would have needed especially fine-tuned control over rapid falls onto prey or in safe landings from higher ground. As Buzz Lightyear would say, “This isn’t flying, it’s falling with style!”
—
Gouache paint on A3-size hot-pressed illustration board, approx. 5-6 hours.
Gang Han et al. 2014. “A new raptorial dinosaur with exceptionally long feathering provides insights into dromaeosaurid flight performance”. Nature Communications. 5: 4382.

ewilloughby:

Changyuraptor yangi is a newly-described microraptorine dromaeosaur dinosaur from the early Cretaceous (Yixian formation) of Liaoning, China.

The animal would have been around 4 feet long in life, and its fossil shows that it was covered in feathers — including, as in its smaller cousin Microraptor, a pair of “leg wings” represented by long paired pennaceous feathers on the metatarsals and tibiotarsus. One of Changyuraptor's most unique features is its voluminous tail feathers, and these feathers constitute the longest of any known non-avian dinosaur, with the most distal retrices reaching around 30 cm in length.

Changyuraptor is also by far the largest “four-winged” dinosaur known, and while this might not be as big of a deal as it sounds (given that there aren’t very many “four-winged” dinosaurs), it does show that small size wasn’t necessarily the gatekeeper to certain volant adaptations. I personally doubt that this animal was doing anything approaching powered flight, but the long tail feathers and multiple sets of long, well-developed lifting surfaces may have been a boon to gliding and controlled descent. The exceptionally long tail feathers therefore might have been used as a sort of “pitch control” device, wherein a large, relatively heavy animal would have needed especially fine-tuned control over rapid falls onto prey or in safe landings from higher ground. As Buzz Lightyear would say, “This isn’t flying, it’s falling with style!”

Gouache paint on A3-size hot-pressed illustration board, approx. 5-6 hours.

Gang Han et al. 2014. “A new raptorial dinosaur with exceptionally long feathering provides insights into dromaeosaurid flight performance”. Nature Communications. 5: 4382.

July 15, 2014   5,503 notes

slaaneshi-party-bus:

catbountry:

prguitarman:

What the fuck is happening

A lot.

Ace Rimmer. What a guy.

(Source: starscream-and-hutch, via infinitemachine)

July 9, 2014   473,688 notes

feathernotdot:

huffingtonpost:

Kids Are Given Game Boys, Feel Instant Sadness

Ah, Game Boys. Forget your 3DS and your iPad mini: there was a day when these handheld hunks of 8-bit glory owned the playground. But these kids don’t remember it so watch the full hilarious video of their reactions to the original Game Boy here. 

(Source: The Fine Brothers)

Gameboy was my fucking childhood. 

…….this is the saddest thing I have seen…..

June 26, 2014   1,097 notes
paleoillustration:

Phorusrhacos by Antarctic Spring

paleoillustration:

Phorusrhacos by Antarctic Spring

(via infinitemachine)